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Features - Editor, 15 October 2007

The Trojan horse of China Business (Part 1)



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The combined glitter of celebrity sites of China business such as Shanghai can hide the myriad profit and growth opportunities for global players in this vast nation. There is abundant criticism that the Beijing government has favored a few urban centers with funds for development, often at the cost of deprived agrarian communities.

The politics of Beijing can also confuse foreigners wishing to engage in China business ventures. The federal government has unrelenting opposition to disputed parts of its borders, the independence of which it challenges. Taiwan is certainly a sore and outstanding case in point!

Superficial conclusions about the spatial distribution of economic development, and about the China business implications of politics, can be entirely misleading, for beneath such surfaces lie some of the most exciting commercial and industrial opportunities.

Fujian Flavors of China Business

Fujian has not been a traditional center of China business. The authorities have occasionally been criticized in the past for neglecting this particular stretch of coastal countryside. Fujian does have a somewhat rebellious image in history, with respect to federal authority under various dispensations of governance. Large numbers of families from this region sailed across the straits to Taiwan when the communists seized power in 1948.

Why has this changed abruptly now? Fujian is the cynosure of both Beijing and Taiwanese eyes, as funds and projects pour in to the once somnolent agrarian environment. The pace of economic development in Fujian is particularly impressive. China business never had it so good in this part of the country! Beijing has always kept a fortified military infrastructure here, but seems to have lately woken up to the imperative of improving China business prospects here as well.

Regardless of their political and ideological opposition, and the many hurdles in the way of direct people-to-people contacts, Taiwan has a soft spot for Fujian. After all, who can deny centuries of family bonds between now estranged communities? Foreign investors, accustomed to the free enterprise and democratic way of doing things, will find Taiwan a familiar and comfortable gateway for China business. Consider this option if you do not want to spend the fixed costs of a mainland organization, and want to start new China business through a culturally appropriate channel.

The Trojan horse of China Business (Part 1)

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